living in the past

I’ve started a somewhat daunting task. I am in the process of adding my posts from eelearning – my first blog – to new eelearning.

Unfortunately, I can’t import them over via WordPress because I can’t remember my user name and password from 10 years ago. Nor can I produce m bill for the domain name. So WordPress won’t give me access to my old account. Understandable.

Knowing that old, inactive blogs eventually get taken down by their hosts, I’ve decided to do the next best thing – cut and paste. Fortunately, posts can be predated so I can post them “on the date” they were posted on eelearning. I’m including comments to the original blogs in the body of the posts here.

I know that such activity could bring action by the copyright holder. But since he is me, I think I’m safe from his wrath.

PLEASE SHARE YOUR THOUGHTS IN COMMENTS BELOW

Do you think these regulations will change anything? Will they drive greater support for data collection in learning? Motivate more collaboration between the business units and L&D?

what you’ve been reading

what you’ve been reading

another interesting bit of data is a listing of the most popular posts on eelearning since i moved over to wordpress.  i’m pleased to see that my posts regarding exemplars in elearning are numbers 1 and 2.  What astounds me is that in 4th is my my post on learning theory resources, my very first post to eelearning. in 5th is my 3rd post which was links to evaluation resources. 

As I said in my last post, it would seem to show, at least among my readership, that people are at least as much interested in content as they are currency.  It also suggests to me that perhaps i should update those posts – because I have added to my personal list of learning theory resources and evaluation resources.  Most can be found in my delicious account.  But some are trapped in my browsers bookmark lists.

post nameviews
what is a “good example”565
exemplary elearning solutions483
buggy whip makers245
learning theory resource links241
evaluation resource links123
where i’d work122
Top Ten learning tools116
are motivation and drive innate or learned?112
there they go with the powerpoint thing, again!102
as if i needed proof96

managerial axioms

This blog was first posted on eelearning.com on 3/21/07

i couldn’t resist. the other day when i was writing my big question post, various axioms kept popping into my head. you know those annoying phrases that people put on posters, plaques, post-its, pens, and other promotion prizes? so here’s a whole list of axioms to clutter up your next powerpoint presentation.

(some of these are original to me – i think.  some come from the leaders i mentioned in my previous post – and may or may not be original to them.  others i’ve heard somewhere, bit don’t remember the source.  if you own the rights to any of these slogans, please be kind and don’t sue me!)

  • you’ll always have too much on your plate, so learn to delegate.
  • micro-manage at your own peril. your employees will hate you and you’ll be exhausted.
  • never punish honesty.
  • the company grapevine is for listening. make sure you can hear it.
  • learn. in every moment. in every crisis. in every victory. learn.
  • everyone learns from failure.
  • learning when to let someone fail is one of the hardest lessons you’ll learn.
  • remember everyone’s birthday.
  • be consistent in what you say, make sure your actions follow your words and your employees will go to the ends of the earth for you.
  • be inconsistent in word and deed and you’ll learn how quickly employees have survival instincts that don’t include you.
  • praise others when they succeed.
  • always take the time to find out what your employees are laughing about.
  • the grass on your side of the fence doesn’t get greener by pointing out your neighbor’s lawn care deficiencies.
  • if you already know the answer, don’t ask the question.
  • keep your eyes on the horizon. looking down at the mess at your feet will paralyze you.
  • are you having fun?

Comments from eelearning

If you’d like to comment in real time in 2021, do so below.

michele eby on 3/26/07

Forget the next presentation. You may have a winning mug slogan or t-shirt axiom here. Good stuff.

bill williams on 5/8/07

Knowledge Sharing: the more you share the more you get

I think I first came across this in an SDC paper (http://www.sdc.admin.ch/en/Home ) but Google throws up lots of examples and variants.